taylor-flavor:

another painting of my dog… i can’t help it she’s just so cute

taylor-flavor:

another painting of my dog… i can’t help it she’s just so cute

aatropos:

raging-raichel:

aryll:

mutisija:

villancikos:

The Anatomy of a mermaid

yes, thanks.
i hate when people draws mermaid’s tail like it was some sort of goddamn suit on normal human legs like this:

it just doesnt work

christmas has come early

Thank you.

christ thanks so much

aatropos:

raging-raichel:

aryll:

mutisija:

villancikos:

The Anatomy of a mermaid

yes, thanks.

i hate when people draws mermaid’s tail like it was some sort of goddamn suit on normal human legs like this:

image

it just doesnt work

christmas has come early

Thank you.

christ thanks so much

beesandbombs:

swirler

beesandbombs:

swirler

libutron:

Leaf-nesting Shrub Frog - Pseudophilautus femoralis
The genus Pseudophilautus consists of 65 known species, all of which are endemic to Sri Lanka. Pseudophilautus femoralis (Rhacophoridae) is an Endangered species whose distribution is restricted to tropical montane forests in central and southern Sri Lanka. 
It is arboreal, and associated with the understorey of tropical moist montane evergreen forest. Individuals are found on, or under, leaves. It is very sensitive to any disturbance of its habitat. Breeding takes place via direct development, with the eggs attached to the underside of leaves, hence its common name of Leaf-nesting Shrub Frog.
References: [1]
Photo credit: ©Sachindra Umesh | Locality: Sri Lanka (2014)

libutron:

Leaf-nesting Shrub Frog - Pseudophilautus femoralis

The genus Pseudophilautus consists of 65 known species, all of which are endemic to Sri Lanka. Pseudophilautus femoralis (Rhacophoridae) is an Endangered species whose distribution is restricted to tropical montane forests in central and southern Sri Lanka. 

It is arboreal, and associated with the understorey of tropical moist montane evergreen forest. Individuals are found on, or under, leaves. It is very sensitive to any disturbance of its habitat. Breeding takes place via direct development, with the eggs attached to the underside of leaves, hence its common name of Leaf-nesting Shrub Frog.

References: [1]

Photo credit: ©Sachindra Umesh | Locality: Sri Lanka (2014)

mrkiki:

César Paternosto
Rectángulos y anamorfosis. 2005. Lápices de acuarela, gesso sobre lienzo. 60 x 60 x 5 cm.
VIA

mrkiki:

César Paternosto

Rectángulos y anamorfosis. 2005.
Lápices de acuarela, gesso sobre lienzo.
60 x 60 x 5 cm.

VIA

wowgreat:

Larsen.Bite

wowgreat:

Larsen.Bite

wowgreat:

Larsen.Bite

wowgreat:

Larsen.Bite

design-is-fine:

Blade Runner by Ridley Scott, production design, 1982. The Tyrell Corporation model piece. Illustrations by Syd Mead, who did the initial concept illustration for the film and also designed many of the vehicles. See more: eldestandonly

cool-critters:

Olm (Proteus anguinus)

The olm, or proteus, is the only cave-dwelling chordate species found in Europe. In contrast to many amphibians, it is entirely aquatic, and it eats, sleeps, and breeds underwater.

Living in caves found in Dinaric Alps, it is endemic to the waters that flow underground through extensive limestone of karst of Central and Southeastern Europe, specifically the southern Slovenia, the Soča river basin near Trieste, Italy, southwestern Croatia, and Herzegovina.

This animal is most notable for its adaptations to a life of complete darkness in its underground habitat. The olm’s eyes are undeveloped, leaving it blind, while its other senses, particularly those of smell and hearing, are acutely developed. It also lacks any pigmentation in its skin. It has three toes on its forelimbs, but two toes on its hind feet. It also exhibits neoteny, retaining larval characteristics like external gills into adulthood.

The olm’s body is snakelike, 20–30 cm (8–12 in) long, with some specimens reaching up to 40 centimetres (16 in). The olm is extremely vulnerable to changes in its environment due to its adaptation to the specific conditions in caves.

On the IUCN Red List, the olm is listed as vulnerable because of its fragmented and limited distribution and ever-decreasing population.

photo credits: Boštjan Burger, mesozoico, slovenia, animalworld